Phone: 800-362-6533  •  Local: 330-497-9650 • Fax: 330-497-0415 7800 Freedom Avenue NW  •  North Canton, Ohio 44720-6978 sales@specialtyhose.com  |  Cage Code 1S353 © 2018 Specialty Hose Corporation  |  All Rights Reserved
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Unlike other electrical systems, aircraft systems use the structure (skin and/or airframe) as a current-carrying conductor. There is no "neutral" wire in aircraft. The aircraft skin and components (and hoses) carry the return current back to the battery. Aircraft can develop high static electrical charges as is evidenced by the need for static dischargers. Arcing can occur between aircraft parts that are at different electrical potentials. In some aircraft, hose is routed through the fuel tanks. Arcing within the fuel tanks can occur if a bonded hose is within spark distance of an unbonded hose. Aircraft can be hit by lightening. Bonded components help the lightening current to flow through the airframe without arcing.  A bonded component is where an electrical conductive path exists between two aircraft parts. A common example is the installation of a bonding strap between the engine mount and the airframe. A metal braid fuel hose or metal tube that is not bonded may have the potential to create arcing or sparking during a lightening strike. Most aluminum fittings have an insulation layer on their outer surface that prevents electrical bonding. This insulation layer is called "anodizing". Anodizing colors the aluminum (as seen in the picture to the right) and protects it from corrosion. But, it is also an insulator. Removing and installing the hose or tube several times will wear through the insulation on the threads and sealing surfaces.

Electrical Conductivity

CERTIFIED WELDING SECTION IX ANSI B31.1 / B31.3 AWS D17.1
For additional information regarding our hose products, please contact us.
Unlike other electrical systems, aircraft systems use the structure (skin and/or airframe) as a current- carrying conductor. There is no "neutral" wire in aircraft. The aircraft skin and components (and hoses) carry the return current back to the battery. Aircraft can develop high static electrical charges as is evidenced by the need for static dischargers. Arcing can occur between aircraft parts that are at different electrical potentials. In some aircraft, hose is routed through the fuel tanks. arcing within the fuel tanks can occur if a bonded hose is within spark distance of an unbonded hose. Aircraft can be hit by lightening. Bonded components help the lightening current to flow through the airframe without arcing.  A bonded component is where an electrical conductive path exists between two aircraft parts. A common example is the installation of a bonding strap between the engine mount and the airframe. A metal braid fuel hose or metal tube that is not bonded may have the potential to create arcing or sparking during a lightening strike. Most aluminum fittings have an insulation layer on their outer surface that prevents electrical bonding. This insulation layer is called "anodizing". Anodizing colors the aluminum (as seen in the picture to the right) and protects it from corrosion. But, it is also an insulator. Removing and installing the hose or tube several times will wear through the insulation on the threads and sealing surfaces.
Phone: 800-362-6533  •  Fax: 330-497-0415 7800 Freedom Avenue NW  •  North Canton, Ohio 44720-6978 sales@specialtyhose.com  |  Cage Code 1S353 © 2018 Specialty Hose Corporation  |  All Rights Reserved
Website design and hosting by EmTech Enterprises
For additional information regarding our hose products, please contact us.

Electrical Conductivity

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Specialty Hose Corporation
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